Feed for category: educational
Bitcoin script 101
In this tutorial we will be looking into the scripting language used by bitcoin. Bitcoin script is a simple forth-like stack based language, basically meaning that it operates using a first-in-last-out principle (FILO) upon a stack based data structure.
The Bitcoin Developer Network (BDN) Is Looking for Contributors

The Bitcoin Developer Network (BDN) aims to become a community-driven project looking at educating the next wave of Bitcoin developers. This is a public invitation for developers, authors, editors, proofreaders, enthusiasts and technical writers to get in touch so that we may reduce the barrier to entry in developing solutions at various layers of this technology.

Considering it’s a community-driven initiative, it only seems fair to do this collaboratively.

Get in touch at inbox@bitcoindev.network

https://bitcoindev.network/

Chaincode Labs Is Hosting Its Fourth Residency Program in Midtown Manhattan Over Summer 2019
Chaincode Labs announced its fourth residency program that will take place in Midtown Manhattan over summer 2019. Read the full announcement here Supporting the developer community and helping new contributors get their start in Bitcoin protocol development is a key part of our mission. Over the past three years, our residency programs have helped many developers start contributing to Bitcoin projects. Alex Bosworth and Johan Halseth (Lightning Labs), Neha Narula (MIT DCI), James O’Beirne and John Newbery (Chaincode Labs), Chris Stewart (SuredBits), Pierre Rochard (Lightning Node Launcher), Rene Pickhardt (LN developer and educator) and Will O’Beirne (Lightning Joule and WebLN) are all Chaincode Residency alumni.
LN Splicing Proposal
Last week, a formal proposal was suggested on the Lightning mailing server by developer Rusty Russell on how we can implement Splicing in lightning channels (“top-up” and “drain” bitcoin from a channel). In this post we explain the concept and briefly review the proposal.
blocksonly mode - how to reduce bandwidth usage by 88%

Running a Bitcoin node is the healthiest way to contribute to the Bitcoin Network but in the past couple of years it has become very expensive to run one both in storage and bandwidth.

A process called blocksonly mode was introduced in Bitcoin 0.12 with the aim of helping Bitcoin Node owners save a hefty amount of bandwidth and still contribute to the network. blocksonly mode allows nodes to stop requesting, relaying and listening for transactions until they are bundled up in a block.